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Archives: Reviews

Cyril Jones July 13, 2018

Cyril Jones Morning Star 12/07/2011 Mick Paynter is left-handed, has always had “a Cornish orientation,” used to be a bolshie trade unionist, doesn’t drive a car and still hitch-hikes occasionally. These facts illuminate and inform a great deal of the content of this bilingual collection by a rebel poet of many causes. His introduction displays the zealousness characteristic of many learners of lesser-used languages: “I love it… it carries in it the soul of Cornwall,”…

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Gwyn Griffiths July 11, 2018

Gwyn Griffiths Morning Star Online 12/06/2011 Plays are written to be performed but that does not mean that they don’t make great reading. That is true of this collection of essentially working-class plays which are a robust, haunting and rich portrayal of Cornwall’s past. The Last Voyage of Alfred Wallis by Donald R Rowe is the poignant story of the last years of artist Alfred Wallis’s life. Wallis had been a sailor, fisherman and rag-and-bone…

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David Buckman

David Buckman Spitalfields Life 20/12/2012 How is it that one of the most innovative, commercially successful, and – in its time – hugely publicized British art groups of the twentieth century became neglected?  That was the case until my book From Bow to Biennale: Artists of the East London Group was published last month.  During the writing of it, whenever I mentioned the Group to experts in this period, the response was usually –  East London Group,…

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Simon Tait

Simon Tait The London Magazine 01/08/2016 When David Buckman’s From Bow to Biennale, Artists of the East London Group was published in 2012 it was the result of nine years of research and shone a light on an unknown group of East End painters who briefly flourished for a decade across the twenties and thirties. They were amateurs, night school pupils of a messianic teacher called John Cooper. Their fame resounded briefly internationally, but then was forgotten.…

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Ham & High – Bridget Galton

Ham & High – Bridget Galton Ham & High 27/09/2016 Bridget Galton talks to the daughter of Indian artist Lancelot Ribeiro whose life, archive and love of the Heath are celebrated at Burgh House An exhibition at Burgh House, a film and talks form part of a heritage project drawing on the personal archive of Indian artist Lancelot Ribeiro. Funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, Retracing Ribeiro will “explore the powerful role that art and…

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The Dickensian – Michael Slater, biographer of Dickens July 10, 2018

The Dickensian – Michael Slater, biographer of Dickens The Dickensian Dickensians will be happy to have a published version of this notable forerunner of The Frozen Deep. Collins’s The Lighthouse is a two-act melodrama in the performance of which audiences were electrified by what Carlyle called Dickens’s ‘wild picturesqueness’ in the role of the guilt-haunted lighthouse keeper, Aaron Gurnock, in three private performances at Tavistock House and a public one for charity at Campden House.…

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Nicholas Ostler April 13, 2018

Nicholas Ostler Endangered Languages Foundation 01/08/2011 Manannan’s cloak is of invisibility, and is traditionally provided by the mists that swirl round Ellan Vannin, the Isle of Man. This doughty work of selection – which is also a mighty labour of love, since the anthologist has translated over 100 pages of Manx into as many pages of English – will actually do more to celebrate Manx than shroud it in more secrecy. It dispels the mists,…

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Times Literary Supplement April 12, 2018

Times Literary Supplement Times Literary Supplement 22/06/2011 Lesser-used languages of the British Isles cont. We believed we had covered them all: Cornish, Manx, Welsh, Romany, Scoots, Irish Gaelic, even St Kilda Gaelic. Our personal criterion for a “living language” is the existence of poetry, or something resembling it. Along the way, we mentioned Channel Islands Norman French, the most remote of our lesser-used languages. Or so we thought. The excellent London publishers Francis Boutle, which…

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Sheila Vanloo

Sheila Vanloo St Austell Voice 05/2010 A marvellous romp with unexpected twists and turns and a variety of weird and wonderful characters Fans of BishBashBosh have come to expect great things with each production and A Mere Interlude is as good as it gets. Alan Kent’s terrific adaptation of the Thomas Hardy novel is a tale of Scilly folk peppered with romance, sex, violence and a huge amount of fun. Set in the late 1880s,…

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The Cornishman

The Cornishman The Cornishman 01/06/2010 Play owes as much to Laurel & Hardy as Thomas Hardy Lit by the sun and the moon, Cornish theatre company BishBashBosh made its debut at the Minack on the finest opening night of the season for many years. Adapted from a Thomas Hardy short story by Cornish playwright Alan M Kent, A Mere Interlude is directed by John Hoggarth and set in the late 19th century. The play concerns…

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